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Review: Twice The Power – Steppin’ Over The Edge

Steppin’ Over The Edge is this group’s debut album released on Wicked Bass Records and SFM Records in 1995 on CD. Steppin’ Over The Edge is actually a compilation album of their most well known songs that were underground singles which received radio play on local radio stations at one point in time. The songs on the album are well known to hardcore longtime San Antonio rap fans. Latin rap meets Miami bass with a hint of Latin music on this album which is why you can hear the usage of heavy bass all over the album. Bass is prevalent all over the album. This album includes their radio singles Meow Meow, Don’t You Know I’m Loco, Wicked Bass, and Power To The People. Most of the radio singles are remixes of the originals. (Some are better. I agree.)

The Twice The Power group is a Latin rap group from the 90s which was based outta San Antonio, Texas. They were active from 1992 to 2002. Their peak years in their prime were from 1993 to 1996. 1993 was a good year for the group. So was 1994. Twice The Power consisted of 3 amigos. They were IROK, Wicked G, and the underground legendary DJ called DJ Devastator.

Don’t You Know I’m Loco is a song that took over SA Town radio stations by storm overnight! Radio stations in San Antonio were playing this song nonstop back in the 90s. The song became an instant favorite among San Antonio rap fans, Spanish music fans, bass heads, and Latin music fans after being played on the airwaves on radio. Longtime San Antonio rap fans definitely remember this song when it was out. This song came out in 1993 and also the version of this song on this album is a 1995 remix by DJ Devastator. Wicked G did some production for the song as well the DJ.

Funk meets Latin rap and bass music on Don’t You Know I’m Loco. The track itself is bass influenced. The track heavily relies on bass to make a long-lasting heavy impact to your ears. The James Brown – Big Payback funk sample can be heard at near the very beginning. The group was also influenced by funk music when recording this song. This track itself has prevalent Latin music and Latin rap influences incorporated inside here.

Don’t You Know I’m Loco is a Twice The Power posse cut telling us about how we don’t know how crazy these amigos are. Don’t You Know I’m Loco is another way of saying “Don’t you know I’m crazy?” Vatos, chicas, and eses from the barrios of the SA streets responded incredibly well to this song.

Wicked Bass is a heavy bass influenced song which itself heavily relies on bass for substance backup. Bass over Latin rap music in a funky mentality is one way to best describe Wicked Bass. The song Wicked Bass has a heavy influence of doodooism. Doodooism is heavy bass and heavy percussion with usage of reduced treble. The term was first coined by hip hop/rap duo Spooky G & Blackjack in 1994.

Wicked Bass had earned them an instant fan following after being played on local radio stations in 1994.The Wicked Bass song became an instant favorite among San Antonio rap fans, Spanish music fans, bass heads, and Latin music fans after being played on the airwaves on radio. Longtime San Antonio rap fans definitely remember this song when it was out.

Wicked G arranged and produced most of the production alongside with DJ Devastator. Despite DJ Devastator doing most of the production work, Wicked G takes most of the credit here. Nevertheless DJ Devastator rightfully earned his place in the spotlight.

Meow Meow is one of their most well known songs to date. Meow Meow is a heavy bass influenced song with a hint of Latin music that earned them an instant fan following after being played on local radio stations in 1993. Radio stations in SA played this song nonstop back then! The song became an instant favorite among San Antonio rap fans, Spanish music fans, bass heads, and Latin music fans after being played on the airwaves on radio. Longtime San Antonio rap fans definitely remember this song when it was out. This version of Meow Meow is the 1995 remix from DJ Devastator.

Sex rap meets Miami bass with a hint of Latin music on Meow Meow. Meow Meow seems to be heavy influenced and inspired by Miami bass music from Miami, Florida. For the most part, the song heavily relies on bass over fast paced beats to back it up. Bass makes songs such as this one more memorable.

Meow Meow is a posse cut about how these 3 amigos get pussy every fucking day. They experiment with sex rap by making various references to sexuality. For instance oral sex and vaginal sex. (They say there is no need to get crazy however this is not the case.) Take swinging for example. Meow Meow is similar to Find’em, Fuck’em, & Flee by NWA. It’s sex, sex, sex here everyday.

Steppin’ Over The Edge is about how these 3 loco amigos are stepping over the edge to gain popularity by all means and any means necessary. IROK, Wicked G, and DJ Devastator are not taking “no” for an answer. They certainly take the cake here on this song! They stood strong as a posse.

Steppin’ Over The Edge is another Twice The Power posse cut that got radio play across SA back in the day. Not only did this not earn them an instant fan following after being played on local radio stations, it became the title for their debut album and a title track. (Radio stations in SA played this song nonstop back then too.) The song became an instant favorite among San Antonio rap fans and Latin music fans after being played on the airwaves on radio. Longtime San Antonio rap fans definitely remember this song.

Sopa Para la Mente is the Spanish cut for this album. The song is obviously influenced by Spanish music, Spanish rap, and Latin music. Fans of Latin rap, Latin music, Spanish rap, and Spanish music will love this Twice The Power song. IROK and Wicked G wrote Sopa Para la Mente in 1994. IROK did most of the production work however. Sopa Para la Mente means Soup For The Mind.

We Come As We Are was Twice The Power’s answer and response to Nemesis – Greet Them With Peace. The track itself offers itself as a peace offering. The peace offering comes as an opening to end all violence worldwide. We Come As We Are is something you would expect from Boogie Down Productions, Kid Frost, Public Enemy, DJ Snake, or Nemesis. This version of We Come As We Are is a 1994 remix from DJ Devastator.

Power To The People is a political rap posse cut raising political awareness to their audience. IROK and Wicked G wrote Power To The People in 1994. No DJ Devastator did not produce this song. IROK and Wicked produced this song. Power To The People is something you would expect to hear from Public Enemy, Boogie Down Productions, or Nas.

When it comes to the history of San Antonio hip hop and San Antonio rap, Twice The Power is a group that hardly gets any mention. The group had a solid fan base and rocked up the hype crowd in their audiences during their concerts across San Antonio, Texas. The socialites and party goers of San Antonio loved the group whenever they perform live. Essentially, the group has more or less faded away with time thus fading away into obscurity. Twice The Power, Brown Tribe, Too Hard Too Hype, Illegal Amigos, Tribe 46, and New Def’Nition were the first wave of Latin rap in San Antonio, Texas. This album is no exception. However despite them earning a steady crowd following among fans, the group more or less was forgotten over time and so were their albums including this one.

I rate this album 5/5*****!!

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